TRILOBITA.DE
Register Calendar Members List Team Members Search Frequently Asked Questions Go to the Main Page

TRILOBITA.DE » TRILOBITA.DE-Forum » Morphologie / Morphology » Leistungsfähigkeit der Trilobitenaugen » Hello Guest [Login|Register]
Last Post | First Unread Post Print Page | Recommend to a Friend | Add Thread to Favorites
Pages (2): [1] 2 next »
Go to the bottom of this page Leistungsfähigkeit der Trilobitenaugen
Author
Post « Previous Thread | Next Thread »
Schachtratte
Member


images/avatars/avatar-9.gif

Registration Date: 27.01.2007
Posts: 1,897

Leistungsfähigkeit der Trilobitenaugen Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Gibt es eigentlich Untersuchungen über die Leistungsfähigkeiten von Trilobitenaugen?
Ist das Auge eines Drotops megalomanicus ( Mike könntest du bitte ein Detailbild liefern?) oder eier Andegavia (oder auch Sagitapeltis) gleich Leistungsfähig? Welche Bedeutung haben Linsenabstand, Linsengröße und Linsenzahl im Bezug auf die Sehfähigkeit? Lässt die Augenform einen Schluss auf den Lebensbereich zu?

__________________
Und was sagen Sie als Unbeteiligter zum Thema Intelligenz?

Der Idealismus wächst mit der Entfernung zum Problem!

"Ein Kluger bemerkt alles, ein Dummer macht über alles seine Bemerkungen."
22.03.2007 14:55 Schachtratte is offline Search for Posts by Schachtratte Add Schachtratte to your Buddy List
Xiphogonium Xiphogonium is a male
Administrator


images/avatars/avatar-125.gif

Registration Date: 26.01.2007
Posts: 2,383
Herkunft: Banana Republic

RE: Leistungsfähigkeit der Trilobitenaugen Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Wenn ich mich recht entsinne hat ein Kumpel von Levi-Seti mal durch ein Phacopiden-Auge bzw. eine Linse davon hindurch eine photographische Aufnahme gemacht.

Mike

__________________
"The gates of Heaven and Hell are adjacent ... and unmarked!" - Carl Sagan
Empfehle uns weiter! ;) (Klappern gehört zum Handwerk!)

22.03.2007 15:01 Xiphogonium is offline Send an Email to Xiphogonium Homepage of Xiphogonium Search for Posts by Xiphogonium Add Xiphogonium to your Buddy List YIM Account Name of Xiphogonium: xiphogonium
Xiphogonium Xiphogonium is a male
Administrator


images/avatars/avatar-125.gif

Registration Date: 26.01.2007
Posts: 2,383
Herkunft: Banana Republic

Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Fortey hat sich hierzu ausgiebig Gedanken gemacht:

---
Five hundred million years ago, trilobites looked at the world through clear calcite glasses. One of the most difficult jobs I ever attempted was to count the number of lenses in a fossil trilobite eye. I had been fascinated by these long-extinct arthropods as a child and have since spent years studying them as a paleontologist. For the task at hand, I took several photographs from different angles of the eye (which was about the size of a grain of rice) and then made enormous prints that allowed me to see the individual lenses (which were microscopic). Eventually I hit upon the notion of pricking each counted lens on the photograph with a pin so that it wasn't counted twice. But when I moved on to the next photo, I would be unsure of the last lens I'd counted and how the tiny hexagons linked up from one picture to the other. Was the last lens the one with the little scratch, or that one a mite larger than its neighbor? The work was undeniably suitable for an obsessive with insomnia, but it was worth it. For trilobites have the first really well-preserved visual systems in the fossil record. Furthermore, their eyes are unique in that they are made of the mineral calcite. The trilobites have many living, if remote, arthropod relatives--and trilobites have been extinct for 250 million years--but no other has chosen the trilobite way to see the world. Calcite is one of the most abundant minerals. The white cliffs of Dover are calcite; so are the bluffs along the Mississippi River. Surely one could expect no surprises from a substance so common and so familiar. But calcite has some unusual properties. Because of its natural impurities it has long provided builders with colorful stone and decorative slabs. The purest examples of calcite, however, are transparent, with perfect crystal form and clarity. The chemical composition, Ca[CO.sub.3], is simple as minerals go. As the crystal grows, the constituent atoms stack together in a lopsided way and do not allow other, stray atoms to intrude to cloud the crystal's mineral exactitude. The clearest calcite crystal, transparent as a toddler's motives, is Iceland spar. Look into a crystal of Iceland spar and you can see the secret of the trilobite's vision. While most other arthropods have lenses made of relatively soft, unmineralized cuticle, similar to that of the rest of their exoskeleton, trilobites used the transparency of clear calcite as a means of transmitting light. The trilobite eye is in continuity with the rest of its shelly armor. It sits on top of the animal's cheek, an en suite eyeglass, tough as a clamshell. Clear calcite is optically complex. If you break a large piece of crystalline calcite, you are left with a regular, six-sided chunk of the mineral--a rhomb--which treats light in a peculiar way. If a beam of light is shone at the sides of the rhomb, the beam splits in two, a phenomenon known as double refraction. The course of the two rays is determined, as is the shape of the rhomb, by the stacking of the individual atoms. There is one direction, and one direction only, in which light does not indulge in this optical split: when a ray of light approaches along what is termed the c axis of the crystal, it is afforded free passage. Like a VIP at an international airport, this privileged ray passes straight through. If a crystal is elongated in parallel to the c axis, into the shape of a long prism, light entering from most angles will be split and the dual rays will in turn be deflected to reach the edge of the prism and will not be "seen" by a receptor cell located at the base of the prism. But light shining along the prism's long axis will still pass unrefracted. This is how most trilobite eyes are constructed. We know that the first trilobites already had a well-developed visual system. Indeed, the large eyes found in the genus Fallotaspis, from Morocco, prove that sophisticated vision goes back at least 540 million years to the Cambrian period. Recent laboratory work has led to the discovery of the pervasive influence of genes that control the sequence of development of the various organs as animals grow from embryo to adult. These are genes so deeply embedded in the body plans of organisms that the memory of their origin is lost far back in Precambrian history. We can never, ever, directly sample the genetic code of the trilobite, but we can be sure that its development was under the control of the same kinds of genes we recognize in living animals. Development inexorably follows a blueprint originally drawn up in the most ancient times. It is rather wonderful to imagine this distant manifesto at work on the growing trilobite, directing the brain to be enclosed within the head and, of course, issuing instructions for the growth and development of eyes. For eyes are part of this ancient list of instructions. It seems that the making of an eye is the same impulse in fish or fly or man. Eyes are under the control of a gene called Pax6. The end product may be very different, but the instruction "Make eyes" may be common to all animals. The deep language of the genes is an Esperanto of biological design that can be understood by all creatures that have light-sensitive organs. Trilobites offer visible evidence of the halfway point in optical history. We can feel a bond with the trilobite that would not have been apparent when nineteenth-century investigators first gazed upon the animal's stony eyes. "Look into my eyes," the trilobite now seems to say, "and you will see the vestiges of your own history." The number of lenses in a trilobite eye varies, according to the species, from a mere one to several thousand, as in the one I attempted to count. This eye was of the compound type and, just like a fly's eye, was a honeycomb of hexagons. In most trilobite lenses, the c axis is exactly at right angles to the surface of the lens. If you can see the whole surface of an individual lens, then the chances are that the lens can "see" you. So you could deduce a trilobite's field of view by summing up the angles of orientation of all the individual lenses. Thirty years ago, Euan Clarkson, of the University of Edinburgh, investigated the field of view of trilobite eyes for the first time. What he did was to mount several species of trilobites in a way that allowed him greater accuracy in measuring the c axis of each of hundreds of hexagonal lenses. Then he plotted the spread of directions of these axes to see what the trilobites saw. Clarkson found that the trilobite eyes he examined looked sideways, forward, and often a little backward. Like searchlights sweeping over the ground and low bushes but not up to the sky, the trilobites' eyes could be cast over the area surrounding the animal, but not upward or directly downward. Most trilobites lived on and around the seafloor, and this was the world they wished to appraise, a world on the sediment wheThe trilobite eye grew in harmony with the animal. As in all arthropods, the eye surface had to be molted along with the rest of the hard exoskeleton. In trilobites, as the new skeleton hardened after each molt, more lenses were added and new crystals generated from a zone at the top of the eye. The animals were not able to see as we see but rather appreciated the world in a thousand fragments of light, as if the brain were a pointillist with a palette of prisms. The eyes may have permitted comprehension of the world in the same fashion as the similar compound eyes of living arthropods. Apposition eyes do not form complete images of their surroundings (some other arthropod eyes have lenses arranged in such a way that they are able to collaborate and produce a single, complex image). But there is another kind of trilobite eye. One of the commonest trilobites in the Devonian rocks of New York, Ohio, Ontario, Germany, and Morocco is the compact animal called Phacops. Its large, crescent-shaped eyes stand prominently atop the cheeks. Instead of lenses so minute that they require a microscope to be seen properly, Phacops's lenses can be recognized by our unaided eyes as tiny, perfectly formed balls, which line up quite conspicuously in rows. These eyes seem to have been turned out by a machine, neat as billiard balls arranged in a box. When sectioned, the eyes reveal their secrets. First, the lenses are indeed nearly spherical, or perhaps slightly drop-shaped, with a disquieting resemblance to glass eyes. Second, there is usually a little "wall" between adjacent lenses, a kind of baffle that stopped light from one lens overlapping that of the next. Often the lenses are slightly sunken, and the areas between them swollen. Clearly a very sophisticated structure (even more so than the hexagonal-lensed trilobite eye), Phacops's crystal eye is a sports coupe in the age of the boneshaker. In 1972 Kenneth M. Towe, of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., demonstrated the efficiency of the Phacops kind of trilobite eyes--by taking photographs through them. The fat, biconvex lenses of the phacopid eye were designed to bring bright beams to a focus. If you hold a clear glass marble up to the light and peer through it, you can get some idea of the process: you will see an upside-down world, all bent and distorted. But in Towe's photos, the trilobite images seem to be much clearer than that. How could this be? The problem with light traveling through a convex lens to a focus is that different rays travel different distances through the lens according to their trajectory. This means that the rays are bent to different degrees. The result is a fuzzy focus. Euan Clarkson and University of Chicago physicist Riccardo Levi-Setti discovered that something strange had happened to the calcite in the lower part of each Phacops lens: magnesium atoms were present in just the right quantity to correct the spherical aberration. For every bend to the left, there was a compensating bend to the right. This corrective layer made a bowl within the lens; the trilobite had thus manufactured what modern opticians term a doublet. The animals with these eyes may have seen more complete images of an object than their hexagonal-lensed fellows. All this 400 million years ago.re, day or night, most of the events affecting their lives took place. Densely lensed eyes of trilobite type are particularly good at detecting movement. Another animal approaching across the sediment surface will trigger one lens after another as its image impinges on different parts of the field of view. If the change is alarming, the trilobite may be stimulated to take evasive action: perhaps to roll up into a ball or to swim away as fast as possible. The trilobite whose lenses I started counting had the hexagonal lens design and was a particularly goggle-eyed species, with peepers puffed up like little bladders. The eyes bulged out on either side of the head in the manner of those slightly grotesque ornamental goldfish that have such a thyroidal look. I named this shrimp-sized animal Opipeuter, having recruited the help of a classicist friend to find out the Greek for "one who gazes." The lenses of Opipeuter's eyes were tiny, but unlike those in the crescent-shaped eyes of most trilobites that lived on the seafloor, Opipeuter's lenses faced in all directions, even downward. This trilobite must have been a free swimmer rather than a bottom dweller. Ancient oceans could have swarmed with trilobites, just as krill throng in modern-day seas. These elongated trilobites were the remote ecological equivalents of shrimp, moving through the water column or even on the surface. A number of different trilobites proved to have this free-swimming design. Fossils of one, the Cyclops-eyed Pricyclopyge, are common in dark Ordovician mudstones 400 million years old. These sediments were originally deposited in relatively deep water, to which these swimmers were apparently confined. Could one somehow test the difference in life habits between shallow- and deep-dwelling trilobites by examining their eyes? Tim McCormick, now at the University of Glasgow, and I, following techniques used to determine how light intensity influences the eyes of living arthropods, were able to insinuate ourselves into the daily lives of our fossil trilobites by making a series of careful measurements on eye construction. We were able to show that Pricyclopyge had eyes constructed in the same fashion as crustaceans that still live in the deeper part of the water column in oceans today. So it seems that trilobites were indeed able to swim at various depths. Blind, totally eyeless trilobites have given us another indication of the range of trilobite habits and habitats. My colleague Bob Owens and I collected trilobite fossils in some localities in Wales where ten or more blind or nearly blind species lived together. They must have crawled about the seafloor in a dark world. Bottom dwellers lost their eyes not because they were degenerate but because, like living crustaceans that inhabit caves, these species simply did not need eyes in their specialized environment. Yet other trilobites in the same Welsh rocks were huge-eyed swimmers. It did not take us long to deduce that the swimmers had swum well above the lightless seafloor on which the blind animals dwelled, and had joined their sightless fellows only when they drifted to the seafloor in death and, fortunately for us, were fossilized.
----

Gruß

Mike

__________________
"The gates of Heaven and Hell are adjacent ... and unmarked!" - Carl Sagan
Empfehle uns weiter! ;) (Klappern gehört zum Handwerk!)

22.03.2007 15:06 Xiphogonium is offline Send an Email to Xiphogonium Homepage of Xiphogonium Search for Posts by Xiphogonium Add Xiphogonium to your Buddy List YIM Account Name of Xiphogonium: xiphogonium
Xiphogonium Xiphogonium is a male
Administrator


images/avatars/avatar-125.gif

Registration Date: 26.01.2007
Posts: 2,383
Herkunft: Banana Republic

Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Hier die gewünschte Detailaufnahme eines Drotops, in diesem Falle armatus:

Xiphogonium has attached this image (reduced version):
__hr_Drotops-Kloc-6.jpg



__________________
"The gates of Heaven and Hell are adjacent ... and unmarked!" - Carl Sagan
Empfehle uns weiter! ;) (Klappern gehört zum Handwerk!)

22.03.2007 15:24 Xiphogonium is offline Send an Email to Xiphogonium Homepage of Xiphogonium Search for Posts by Xiphogonium Add Xiphogonium to your Buddy List YIM Account Name of Xiphogonium: xiphogonium
Schachtratte
Member


images/avatars/avatar-9.gif

Registration Date: 27.01.2007
Posts: 1,897

Thread Starter Thread Started by Schachtratte
Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Danke, und wenn inch jetzt noch von Andrue ein Auge einer Andegavia bekommen könnte?

__________________
Und was sagen Sie als Unbeteiligter zum Thema Intelligenz?

Der Idealismus wächst mit der Entfernung zum Problem!

"Ein Kluger bemerkt alles, ein Dummer macht über alles seine Bemerkungen."
22.03.2007 15:26 Schachtratte is offline Search for Posts by Schachtratte Add Schachtratte to your Buddy List
Schachtratte
Member


images/avatars/avatar-9.gif

Registration Date: 27.01.2007
Posts: 1,897

Thread Starter Thread Started by Schachtratte
RE: Leistungsfähigkeit der Trilobitenaugen Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

quote:
Original von Xiphogonium
Wenn ich mich recht entsinne hat ein Kumpel von Levi-Seti mal durch ein Phacopiden-Auge bzw. eine Linse davon hindurch eine photographische Aufnahme gemacht.

Mike


Dass man durch die Linsen schauen oder aber auch fotografieren kann, ist nicht die Frage. Mir ging es eher um die Leistungsfähigkeit in Punkto Auflösung und Lichtstärke. Waren sie mit denen von heutigen Insekten vergleichbar?

__________________
Und was sagen Sie als Unbeteiligter zum Thema Intelligenz?

Der Idealismus wächst mit der Entfernung zum Problem!

"Ein Kluger bemerkt alles, ein Dummer macht über alles seine Bemerkungen."
22.03.2007 20:03 Schachtratte is offline Search for Posts by Schachtratte Add Schachtratte to your Buddy List
Xiphogonium Xiphogonium is a male
Administrator


images/avatars/avatar-125.gif

Registration Date: 26.01.2007
Posts: 2,383
Herkunft: Banana Republic

Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Ich kann mich an keine mir bekannte Arbeit erinnern, die sich damit näher beschäftigt. Man könnte aber annehmen, daß facettenartige Augen - auch wenn sie aus Kalzit statt einer chitinösen Substanz wie bei rezenten Arthropoden bestanden - eine ähnliche "Auflösung" besaßen wie etwa bei einer heutigen Fliege. Dies dürfte insbesondere auf holochroale Augen zutreffen, die zumeist eine deutlich höhere Anzahl kleinerer Linsen aufweisen als die schizochoralen Augen der Phacopina, die ja zumeist großformatiger sind.

Mike


EDIT: Bei den schizochroalen Großlinsen kann man durchaus annehmen, daß sich die visuellen Erfassungsbereiche der Einzellinsen ab einer gewissen Distanz überlagerten und so womöglich ein "facettenfreies" Gesamtbild gewährleisteten.

EDIT zum EDIT: Als Beispiel für letzteres könnte man ein schlichtes Binokular nehmen. Auch hier sind die "Objektive" ja nicht direkt nebeneinander, dennoch nehmen wir die sich überschneidenden Einzelbilder als ein Gesamtbild wahr.

__________________
"The gates of Heaven and Hell are adjacent ... and unmarked!" - Carl Sagan
Empfehle uns weiter! ;) (Klappern gehört zum Handwerk!)

22.03.2007 20:27 Xiphogonium is offline Send an Email to Xiphogonium Homepage of Xiphogonium Search for Posts by Xiphogonium Add Xiphogonium to your Buddy List YIM Account Name of Xiphogonium: xiphogonium
Xiphogonium Xiphogonium is a male
Administrator


images/avatars/avatar-125.gif

Registration Date: 26.01.2007
Posts: 2,383
Herkunft: Banana Republic

Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

In diesem Zusammenhang kann ich es einfach nicht unterlassen nochmal auf folgendes hinzuweisen, ausgeschnitten aus meiner Website:

In diesem Zusammenhang möchte ich ausdrücklich darauf hinweisen, daß die sehr oft bei hochpreisigen russischen Präparaten (z. B. von Hoplolichas, Hoplolichoides, etc.) anzutreffenden schizochroal anmutenden Augen samt und sonders als Fälschungen anzusehen sind. Bekanntermaßen gehören diese Trilobiten zur Ordnung der Lichida, nicht der Phacopida und können daher gar keine schizochroalen Augen besitzen. Vielmehr werden die regelmäßig nicht erhalten gebliebenen holochroalen Ocellenfelder aus verkaufsfördernden Gründen einfach durch schizochroal anmutende Kunststoffaugen ersetzt. Umso erstaunlicher, daß diese teilgefakten Präparate über viele Jahre hinweg zu teils astronomischen Preisen an den Mann gebracht werden konnten und viele Sammler erst spät mit teils sogar ungespielter Empörung darauf reagierten. Dies beweist nur daß viele Sammler ihrem Hobby nachgehen ohne sich etwas detaillierter mit dem zu beschäftigen, was sie sich in die repräsentative Vitrine stellen. Wer dies als Schelte versteht, der hat recht verstanden.

<g>

__________________
"The gates of Heaven and Hell are adjacent ... and unmarked!" - Carl Sagan
Empfehle uns weiter! ;) (Klappern gehört zum Handwerk!)

22.03.2007 21:03 Xiphogonium is offline Send an Email to Xiphogonium Homepage of Xiphogonium Search for Posts by Xiphogonium Add Xiphogonium to your Buddy List YIM Account Name of Xiphogonium: xiphogonium
Rudolf Rudolf is a male
Inner Circle


images/avatars/avatar-7.jpg

Registration Date: 29.01.2007
Posts: 653
Herkunft: Bayern jetzt Bensheim

Facettenaugen bei Insekten Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Im Spektrum der Wissenschaft war vor einigen Jahren ein Artikel über die Leistungsfähigkeit von Insektenaugen.
Das Ergebniss aus dem Gedächtnis frei wiedergegeben lautete:
Jedes Insekt hat die Augen die es benötigt.
Libellen können fliegede Objekte besser sehen als andere da sie die Beute im Flug fangen. UV-Licht sehen sie nicht.
Stubenfliegen sehen am besten das was auf sie zukommt um auszuweichen.
Bienen sehen UV-licht und können die polarisation erkennen. UV-Licht um Blüten zu erkenne.Polarisation um sich zu orientieren.

Also alle haben die Augen die sie brauchen um zu überleben.Das dürfte bei unseren Trilos genauso gewesen sein.
Viele liebe Grüße
Rudolf :D

__________________
Der Klügere gibt nach führt zu einer Regierung von Dummköpfen
23.03.2007 09:08 Rudolf is offline Send an Email to Rudolf Search for Posts by Rudolf Add Rudolf to your Buddy List
Agnostus Agnostus is a male
Inner Circle


Registration Date: 16.02.2007
Posts: 275
Herkunft: Mecklenburg

RE: Facettenaugen bei Insekten Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Hallo Rudolf

Das sehe ich ähnlich.
Interessant wären ja mal Untersuchungen an Asseiaugen, die Ergebnisse dürften dann der Antwort auf Udos Frage am nächsten kommen. Zumal Asseln auch eine hohe Diversität besitzen
und ökologische Nischen besetzen, die mal im Besitz unserer Krabbeltieren waren (ausgenommen Süsswasser und Festland natürlich).

Grüsse
Ronald
23.03.2007 18:27 Agnostus is offline Send an Email to Agnostus Search for Posts by Agnostus Add Agnostus to your Buddy List
Schachtratte
Member


images/avatars/avatar-9.gif

Registration Date: 27.01.2007
Posts: 1,897

Thread Starter Thread Started by Schachtratte
RE: Facettenaugen bei Insekten Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

quote:
Original von Agnostus
Hallo Rudolf

Das sehe ich ähnlich.
Interessant wären ja mal Untersuchungen an Asseiaugen, die Ergebnisse dürften dann der Antwort auf Udos Frage am nächsten kommen. Zumal Asseln auch eine hohe Diversität besitzen
und ökologische Nischen besetzen, die mal im Besitz unserer Krabbeltieren waren (ausgenommen Süsswasser und Festland natürlich).

Grüsse
Ronald


Ich zitiere hier gerne noch mal den Sten mit der Ausgabe 42/2006. Dort ist die Riesenassel Bathynomus giganteus abgebildet (erreicht bis 40cm, krabbelt bis 2000m tiefe) die spontan an einen Trilo erinnert, vor allem was die Haltung und die Beine angeht. Man sieht sehr gut, das sie den Panzer trägt und der schildähnlich verbreiterte Rand nicht zur Vergrößerung der Auflagefläche dient. Eine Situation, wie ich sie auch den Trilobiten zuschreibe. Der von Jens angeführte Schneeschuheffekt wird nicht durch den Panzer erzielt, sondern über die Fiedern an den Beinchen.

Hier ein paar Links:
http://www.photovault.com/Link/Animals/A...01/AARV01P11_03
http://images.google.de/imgres?imgurl=ht...%3Djaf%26sa%3DN
http://images.google.de/imgres?imgurl=ht...%3DDvK%26sa%3DN

__________________
Und was sagen Sie als Unbeteiligter zum Thema Intelligenz?

Der Idealismus wächst mit der Entfernung zum Problem!

"Ein Kluger bemerkt alles, ein Dummer macht über alles seine Bemerkungen."

This post has been edited 2 time(s), it was last edited by Schachtratte: 24.03.2007 08:22.

24.03.2007 08:16 Schachtratte is offline Search for Posts by Schachtratte Add Schachtratte to your Buddy List
Agnostus Agnostus is a male
Inner Circle


Registration Date: 16.02.2007
Posts: 275
Herkunft: Mecklenburg

RE: Facettenaugen bei Insekten Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Hallo Udo,
da werde ich logischer weise auch mit darauf achten, wenn ich den Beifang begutachten kann. Nächste: Reise SE Grönlandschelf, Grundfischerei. Mal sehen was so alles drin sein wird. :D

Grüsse
Ronald
24.03.2007 09:01 Agnostus is offline Send an Email to Agnostus Search for Posts by Agnostus Add Agnostus to your Buddy List
Schachtratte
Member


images/avatars/avatar-9.gif

Registration Date: 27.01.2007
Posts: 1,897

Thread Starter Thread Started by Schachtratte
Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Ich auch.

__________________
Und was sagen Sie als Unbeteiligter zum Thema Intelligenz?

Der Idealismus wächst mit der Entfernung zum Problem!

"Ein Kluger bemerkt alles, ein Dummer macht über alles seine Bemerkungen."
24.03.2007 10:08 Schachtratte is offline Search for Posts by Schachtratte Add Schachtratte to your Buddy List
Michael Michael is a male
Inner Circle


Registration Date: 16.02.2007
Posts: 892
Herkunft: Oberfranken

Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Hallo,

schon faszinierend die Bilder der Riesen- Isopoden. Kann man sich aufgrund der äußeren Ähnlichkeiten schon ein bißchen besser vorstellen, wie die Trilos wohl mal rumgewuselt sind. Vielleicht kannst Du ja eine mitbringen, Ronald ?!?
Du wärst doch bestimmt ein guter Asselfütterer, vielleicht daheim in der Wanne ? Lollilutscher
Falls dass nicht klappt, vielleicht ein Foto?
Ist übrigens auch faszinierend ein Limulus- Aquarium zu beobachten, im Zoo natürlich, hab daheim keins. Meine Frau hat jedenfalls nach einer Stunde gefragt, ob wir uns auch noch andere Tiere anschauen wollen...Nur so am Rande, wo wir gerade über die entferntere triloverwandschaft reden.
Jedenfalls schön aufpassen auf die Asseln ;)

Viele Grüße
Michael
24.03.2007 23:57 Michael is offline Send an Email to Michael Search for Posts by Michael Add Michael to your Buddy List
Agnostus Agnostus is a male
Inner Circle


Registration Date: 16.02.2007
Posts: 275
Herkunft: Mecklenburg

Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Hallo Michael,

ok, ich schau mal. ;)
Diesmal werde ich aber aufpassen, das dann noch eine für mich übrig bleibt. Denn die Serolis hatte ich mir alle abschwatzen lassen. Und seit der Wende wird von deutschen Fischereischiffen das Argentinien/ Falklandschelf nicht mehr befischt, wodurch ich von dort keinen Nachschub mehr bekomme. :D

Grüsse
Ronald
25.03.2007 06:16 Agnostus is offline Send an Email to Agnostus Search for Posts by Agnostus Add Agnostus to your Buddy List
Schachtratte
Member


images/avatars/avatar-9.gif

Registration Date: 27.01.2007
Posts: 1,897

Thread Starter Thread Started by Schachtratte
Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Also so eine Monsterassel wäre auch schon was für mich. Anmeld!

__________________
Und was sagen Sie als Unbeteiligter zum Thema Intelligenz?

Der Idealismus wächst mit der Entfernung zum Problem!

"Ein Kluger bemerkt alles, ein Dummer macht über alles seine Bemerkungen."
25.03.2007 09:54 Schachtratte is offline Search for Posts by Schachtratte Add Schachtratte to your Buddy List
Agnostus Agnostus is a male
Inner Circle


Registration Date: 16.02.2007
Posts: 275
Herkunft: Mecklenburg

Monsterassel Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Hallo allerseits,

Bestellungen nehme ich zwar gerne an. :D aber macht Euch keine all zu grossen Hoffnungen.
Darum einige Bemerkungen dazu:
Wir fischen auf dem Schelf, seltener tiefer. Zweitens diese Asseln sind Einzelgänger. Drittens es ist ein Fischereisshiff und kein Forschungsschiff, d.h. es wird wohl nur darauf geachtet, wenn ich meine Kollegen sensibilisiere ( und die Zeit auch da sein sollte zum Nachschauen) oder wenn ich während der Freizeit dazu die Möglichkeit habe selbst Ausschau zu halten. Viertens während des Verabeitungsprozesses wandert soetwas schnell in den Abfall und geht aussenbords ( worauf die Möven lauern).
Es ist aber prinzipiell möglich, da wir auf Heilbutt gehen, solche Asseln als Beifang, quasi in situ, also festgekrallt an ihren Opfern, mitfangen. Falls sie nicht voher selbst zur Beute werden. Mir selbst ist nur ein solches Beispiel bekannt. 1988 vor Argentinien hatten wir einen Fisch mitgefangen an dem so eine Assel( ca.10 cm lang) festgekrallt hing. Leider war sie vor Schichtende dem Kollegen verloren gegangen ;( ( Schiffe und Asseln bewegen sich nun mal ;))
Ihr seht schon, die Dinger sind also sehr rar.

Grüsse
Ronald

This post has been edited 3 time(s), it was last edited by Agnostus: 25.03.2007 11:48.

25.03.2007 11:44 Agnostus is offline Send an Email to Agnostus Search for Posts by Agnostus Add Agnostus to your Buddy List
Schachtratte
Member


images/avatars/avatar-9.gif

Registration Date: 27.01.2007
Posts: 1,897

Thread Starter Thread Started by Schachtratte
Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Wir werden sehen, sagt der Stumme zum Blinden...

__________________
Und was sagen Sie als Unbeteiligter zum Thema Intelligenz?

Der Idealismus wächst mit der Entfernung zum Problem!

"Ein Kluger bemerkt alles, ein Dummer macht über alles seine Bemerkungen."
25.03.2007 12:01 Schachtratte is offline Search for Posts by Schachtratte Add Schachtratte to your Buddy List
Agnostus Agnostus is a male
Inner Circle


Registration Date: 16.02.2007
Posts: 275
Herkunft: Mecklenburg

Monsterassel Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

na mal gucken............ ;)
25.03.2007 16:27 Agnostus is offline Send an Email to Agnostus Search for Posts by Agnostus Add Agnostus to your Buddy List
Michael Michael is a male
Inner Circle


Registration Date: 16.02.2007
Posts: 892
Herkunft: Oberfranken

Reply to this Post Post Reply with Quote Edit/Delete Posts Report Post to a Moderator       Go to the top of this page

Hi Ronald,
bist sozusagen hiermit offizieller Asselbeauftragter geworden...Das sind Karrieren ! Respekt
Viele grüße
Michael
25.03.2007 21:52 Michael is offline Send an Email to Michael Search for Posts by Michael Add Michael to your Buddy List
Pages (2): [1] 2 next » Tree Structure | Board Structure
Jump to:
TRILOBITA.DE » TRILOBITA.DE-Forum » Morphologie / Morphology » Leistungsfähigkeit der Trilobitenaugen

Privacy policy

Forum Software: Burning Board 2.3.6, Developed by WoltLab GmbH